On Our Bookshelf

What’s On Your Money Coach’s Bookshelf?

Beat The Bank
Larry Bates, 2018

If you want to know how to avoid lining the pockets of our big banks by doing the opposite of what they recommend, this is a must read. He breaks investing down to its basics – keeping costs low, appreciating why index investing is superior to active management, and ensuring investments are risk-appropriate. He includes easy-to-read charts and how-to steps that will help both the novice investor and the sophisticated stock-picker who needs to come back to the basics.


Millionaire Teacher
Andrew Hallam, 2011

A school teacher from B.C., Andrew Hallam built a million dollar investment portfolio and retired far earlier than his peers by focusing on the important things: low cost passive investing, smart expense management and having a philosophy that eliminates worries when markets are swinging (up or down). There are lots of good ideas throughout this must-read for those who want to improve their relationship with money.


The Richest Man in Babylon
George S. Classon, 1926

An absolute classic, with financial lessons taken from one of the richest of ancient societies. Dispenses advice through a set of parables that speak to the reader as well today as 5,000 years ago.  Short but gripping – time well spent.


The Millionaire Next Door
Thomas J. Stanley and William D. Danko, 1998

Features extensive interviews, research and profiling of America’s millionaires to understand what made them wealthy.  A surprising and insightful look into the careers, characteristics and wallets of this fascinating demographic.


More Than Enough
Dave Ramsey, 2002

From one of the most popular personal finance gurus in the last 10 years, this book is a must for those looking to remove debt from their lives.  His style is blunt but his following includes tens of thousands who have turned their financial life around.


Rich is a State of Mind
Robert M. Gignac, 2011

This ‘story-book’ format read shares personal finance best practices like ‘understanding the power of compound interest’ and the wonder of ‘dollar cost averaging’.  A great book for the person starting to get serious with their money.  And as this book attests, the earlier the better.


The Wealthy Barber Returns
David B. Chilton, 2011

Back with his ‘pay yourself first’ mantra and self-deprecating humour, Chilton loses the story book format but dispenses wonderful financial truths in what is sure to compete with his original best-seller from over 20 years ago.

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